IxD Examples

 

The history of interaction design is not long, but over the years a number of designs have emerged that stand out as particularly significant for the field. To get an idea of what is perceived as excellence, browse the 30 most influential products in interaction design from Kicker studio.

Below you will find a mix of examples from IxD teaching and research that relate to other design fields represented at Faculty of Informatics and Design. Some are from the Interaction Design master program at Malmö University in Sweden, which has served as a model for the MTech program at CPUT.

Light Graffiti
by Do-Fi 2009
Recollect
by Quentin Duncan, Sergio M. Galán Nieto, Marcus Paeschke, Adeel Rashid (K3) 2009
Graphic design
InSpot Museum
by Simon Thorsander (K3) 2004
Interior design
Trackboard 
by Rob Nero (K3) 2009
Tune-In-Music
by Albert Coertse, Ben Bell, Ewaldi Grove, Harriet Kasper (CPUT) 2006
Industrial design
Touch Me
by Romy Kniewel and Lilly Yeh (K3) 2008
Jewellery design
Surface design
Critical Corset
by Vanessa Carpenter (K3) 2008

This is an example from the IxD master’s program at School of Arts and Communication, Malmö University, Sweden. The Critical Corset is not only a garment to wear, but also an artifact in the genre of critical design. As an example of this genre, the Critical Corset asks questions about our relation to technology – more specifically, what we are prepared to do to look good.

A re-enforced corset has been equipped with two urine-bags from medical industry. The urine-bags receive air from an air pump controlled by an Arduino-board. The Arduino-board reads your heart rate and if it reaches above a certain level, it inflates the corset. So, as you enter a club and see someone you are attracted to, the corset automatically makes you look better. And it won’t let go until your heart rate drops.

Fashion design

This is an example from the IxD master’s program at School of Arts and Communication, Malmö University, Sweden. Recollect offers you a new way of organizing your memories. Now you can link photos and music to places and times, in a graphic web that you navigate on your smartphone.

Light Graffiti was designed by Johan Salo and Magnus Wallon, ex-students at the IxD master’s program at School of Arts and Communication, Malmö University, Sweden, and formers of the design bureau Do-Fi.

Light graffiti allows you to enjoy the creative activity of graffiti without leaving permanent marks. Two sensors mounted on the wall of a building are used to track spraycans with different colours, and control the projection of light.

Read more here.

Simon Thorsander designed a gestural interfaces that uses two cameras to detect movement in front of a screen. This allows shop-interior designers to place interactive media application in the shop window. The users can then interact with the media through the shop window. InSpot Museum is an example from the IxD master’s program at School of Arts and Communication, Malmö University, Sweden.

This is an example from students at the National Diploma program in 3D-design at Department of Industrial Design, Cape Peninsula University of Technology.

TIM (Tune In Music) is a mobile unit that lets you keep track of what is going on in the music clubs on Lower Main Road in Observatory, Cape Town. When you select a music club, a live feed is streamed to the device and the street address of the club is shown on a small display. If there is no on-going musical performance at the moment, samples from upcoming bands are streamed together with spoken announcements. This way TIM enhances the established local culture of club-hopping in Lower Main at night time, as well as supports the planning of a night out during day time.

Another example from the IxD master’s program at School of Arts and Communication, Malmö University, Sweden.

Being unhappy with today’s trackpads and joystick knobs in laptops, Rob Nero started out from the common problem of being on the move and constantly finding yourself in places with too little space to use a proper mouse.

The result was a proof-of-concept prototype for a new input device. The device uses infrared laser to track your fingers as they hover over the keyboard, thereby controlling the cursor movements. You can also do single and double clicks, and other gestures, by “clicking in the air”.

Though it is a demanding prototype to build, it should be noted that Rob did not have any experience with programming, electronics or physical computing when he started.

This is an example from the IxD master’s program at School of Arts and Communication, Malmö University, Sweden. Romy Kniewel designed an interactive brooch that used LEDs to display patterns depending on how it was touched.

We are hoping that we soon will be able to show an example of interactive jewelry. After all, why does the ubiquitous mobile phone have to be a box we keep in our pocket. Why not integrate the different parts into beautiful jewellery.

Sparky
by By Hamish Chilton, Kevin Gladwell, Amanda Hall, Björn Peterson & Brent Swanepoel (K3) 2007

Sparky is a health-awareness pet for teaching children about invisible dangers in our environment, built on the Arduino-platform. He responds negatively to: carbon monoxide, cigarette smoke, alcohol, lack of light, hitting and yelling.

Read more here.